Data science vs social media disinformation: the case of climate change and the Australian bushfires

Data science vs social media disinformation: the case of climate change and the Australian bushfires

While a newly released World Weather Attribution study ties the Australian bushfires to anthropogenic climate change, disinformation on social media abounds

Has human-induced climate change altered the likelihood and intensity of fire-weather risk in the southeastern Australian bushfires in 2019/2020? This is the question World Weather Attribution (WWA) set out to study, and results suggest there is a link between the Australian bushfires and human-induced climate change.

WWA is an international effort to analyse and communicate the possible influence of climate change on extreme weather events, such as storms, extreme rainfall, heatwaves, cold spells, and droughts. Climate change attribution was recently listed as a breakthrough technology by MIT Technology review, and WWA is behind this.

Today, WWA just released an analysis on the recent Australian bushfires, and ZDNet connected with WWA to learn more about it. At the same time, another analysis by the Brown university verifies what previous studies suggested: climate disinformation on social media abounds. The battle between bots and (data) science is raging.

Recognising society’s interest in reducing the human, economic, and environmental costs of weather-related disasters, WWA delivers timely and scientifically reliable information on how extreme weather may be affected by climate change. This is how the WWA describes its mission.

Read the full article on ZDNet

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